Posts filed under ‘Green Marketing’

Rent Out Roof Space To Your Energy Company

All across the US, homeowners are getting paid by their energy utility to have solar panels installed. That’s because power companies have an urgent need for roof space. They’re in a race against the clock to replace ever greater portions of the regular energy supply by power sourced from renewables.
image courtesy Phylevn

image courtesy Phylevn

The trend began with deals between energy companies and various large companies and local municipalities to install solar panels on large premises in return for a fee. One example is ProLogis, a large distributor in California, getting solar energy from systems installed and run by outside energy companies. The first such deal was when General Motors got solar panels installed on the roofs of its Spain production facilities. (more…)

March 23, 2009 at 10:08 pm Leave a comment

Solar WiFi Comes To Businesses

It sounds iffy; running your company’s network on a WiFi connection that is entirely powered by solar energy. But a Mountainview, CA firm says it provides a 100% uptime solution. And it reports a mad dash for its products by companies in the range of 50 to 200 employees.

Mesh WiFi firm Meraki started shipping its Meraki Solar December 4th, after a year long delay because it needed to improve its battery technology.

The delay lands both the firm and customers in a slightly awkward situation. The worldwide run on solar power equipment seemed overly justified when oil prices spiked. Now that the price of oil is in the 40 dollar bracket, what should solar be priced at? Meraki has found a creative way around this stumbling block. Customers can bring their own panels! They’re selling solar Wifi solutions for apartment blocks or businesses and small communities at $749 a piece for a bring-your-own-panel model up to $1,499 for areas with shorter days or less light which require a battery.

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March 15, 2009 at 10:13 pm Leave a comment

Motorola Launches Its First Carbon Neutral Phone

Motorola recently launched what they claim to be first ever carbon neutral phone at the Consumer Electrics Show in Las Vegas. Additionally, the plastics used in the phone’s exterior are made from recycled water bottles.  The company signed up with Carbonfund.org to offset the carbon produced during the manufacturing process of the handset. Distribution and operating activities are also offset. Motorola invests in the Carbonfund’s program of renewable energy and reforestation investments.

When you take a close look at the phone you will see that the Carbonfund investment is not a free ticket to environmental utopia because the press buttons and the robust exterior are entirely made of the kinds of metals that still will need recycling at the end of the phone’s life. But, having said that, knowing that the plastics are 100% made of recycled bottles is hopeful, especially when competitors like Nokia and Samsung are using bioplastics made from food crops. The Carbonfund also awarded Motorola with its CarbonFree® Product Certification after an extensive product life-cycle assessment. (more…)

January 29, 2009 at 9:45 pm Leave a comment

The Next Bull Will Be ‘Green’

Admittedly, it’s a bit obscene to talk of a new bull market now that Wall Street is heavily sick and in need of a trillion dollar bailout. But perhaps it makes sense to do it anyway because it’s very likely that the next bull’s going to be colored brightly green.

Green investing is set to become easier as new markets are emerging and platforms dedicated to the general grey economy’s pollution problems begin to take off in earnest. “A whole new multibillion-dollar green economy will rise–and with it the kind of massive financial opportunity that could get not only America but also Wall Street back on its feet”, writes to Glenn Hurowitz in a report entitled “The Next Bull Market” in The Nation.

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September 27, 2008 at 8:54 pm Leave a comment

How Viral Does Green Marketing Get?

Viral marketing is a concept that few of us environmentalists are naturally inclined to take up in a technical sense. Yet there’s no denying that green has got wonderful potential when it comes to creatively using the internet to spread messages.

It’s surprising that there’s hardly any attention from the either marketing professionals for green or from “green eco-battle-axes” in cross fertilizing with the marketer guys. Everybody who knows the very basics of marketing knows that keeping up with the trends is something that’s the hallmark of any successful marketer. Green marketing, whilst a hype in the high street shops, is not so much an online viral gimmick most likely because it’s simply too earthy. (more…)

September 2, 2008 at 10:49 pm Leave a comment

G8 Commissioned Study Reveals That Tough Climate Targets Can Be Achieved

Low carbon societies can become a reality because technically and economically it is possible to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, say scientists from nine countries who researched the issue on behalf of the G8. They say that reducing global carbon emissions by half by 2050 is feasible if clever models are applied and outlined details of three extensive models in a peer reviewed article in Climate Policy.

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June 28, 2008 at 9:14 pm Leave a comment

Fridges Can Cut Energy Usage By Half If Alloy Based Chemicals Are Used

European researchers say they have begun to develop fridges that are powered by a 100% alloy which will reduce their energy usage by 50%. In the last 15 years, fridge technology developers have had to consider what option would be the lesser of two evils. Environmentalists alerted them to the harmful side effects of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), the refrigerant chemical, but alternative refrigerants require a lot more energy.

But now there’s an alternative to both chemicals, a solution that will reduce your fridge’s energy bill by half. Trick is to use electromagnetic fields cleverly. No joking. The scientists work on behalf of BASF, the chemicals company, and a Dutch foundation called Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM). They are pioneering technology based on magnetocaloric materials (again, no joking). These materials are a new class of refrigerants and are set to significantly reduce the negative impact of today’s cooling systems on the environment.
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June 19, 2008 at 8:51 pm Leave a comment

Creating Order In The Chaos Of Enterprise Carbon Credits

carbontr.jpgCompanies involved in offsetting their carbon footprint have access to over twenty tools to calculate their emissions, most of which have been launched in the last year. So far, the voluntary carbon offsetting market is dominated by European players. Reviews of their efforts have not been all too positive, so US companies following in their footsteps do best to avoid the pitfalls.

The main criticism centers on what´s left out of the equasion. Companies embarking on greening up their business practices are faced with a daunting task and most go about it the `easy way´ at first. There´s the option to simply offset carbons on the Chicago Climate Exchange, the European Climate Exchange or on the newly established NYMEX venture, the Green Exchange. Businesses have access to these exchanges if they wish to reduce their overall greenhouse gas emissions by as little as 1%.

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April 8, 2008 at 9:39 am Leave a comment

Key Greenhouse Gas Emissions Data Set To Boost Prices On The European Climate Exchange

European carbon traders are eagerly awaiting benchmark numbers on European greenhouse gas emissions during 2007. European countries ought to have submitted the data in a central system yesterday but many failed to meet the deadline. banner_environment_en.jpg

That is why the Brussels authorities in charge of the central system have not yet released the information on the Community Independent Transaction Log (CITL), the central system. The numbers are key because they allow market traders to know the right level of demand for the instruments they trade.

EU regulations mandate that energy-intensive companies involved in carbon offsets submit one emissions permit for every ton of carbon dioxide emissions they create. The permits are called EU Allowances (EUAs) and since 2005 there’s been a healthy trade in them. Traders have created futures and options derived from the EUAs. Volumes as well as the prices on the European Climate Exchange have been going through the roof in the past year. During March 2008, almost 120 million tonnes EUAs were traded, an increase of 61% compared to March 2007.

Reuters interviewed a Deutsche Bank analyst, Mark Lewis, about his expectations for the 2007 emissions levels. Lewis expects 2007 carbon dioxide emissions to be between 2,180-2,220 million tons. 2007 levels were between 2,100-2,140 million tons.

The 2008 permit supply is 2,083 million tons, which means there’s a shortage of supply. EUA prices will likely rock once the data is released. Lewis estimates the price is likely to go up to 35 euros per ton during 2008-12. Last Friday, EUA futures contracts were trading down 14 cents at 22.12 euros ($34.87).

During the first phase of the carbon market (2005-2007) trading was characterized by an oversupply of permits which caused the carbon price to fall.

The UK has independently already released its estimates for 2007 emissions levels. Government officials published provisional figures showing UK emission levels reached 639.4 million tonnes, which was 2 percent lower than the 2006.

The authorities in charge of CITL reported that not enough data had been submitted for them to release it. At least 80% of the data entered for the 2006 emissions needs to have been reported before the numbers will be released. This is so the markets don’t trade on false information.

CITL announced that it won’t ‘give public access to installation-level verified emissions data today [April 1]’. Instead, the data will be released as soon as enough submissions have been registered to make the 80% grade.
The officials in charge will release the numbers until at least 80% of the data that was submitted in 2006 has been entered.

Angelique van Engelen writes http://Amplifiedgreen.wordpress.com, a blog about micro green options, macro perspectives.

April 3, 2008 at 9:38 am Leave a comment

The Perils Of Green Marketing – Eco Whisky’s Healthy (For The Environment)!

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The green marketing hype has great potential for cutting it real thin when it comes to alcohol. No regulators are interfering yet, so McCormick Distillery will likely inspire other minds with the campaign for its new -ultra luxerious- 360 Vodka brand. The company says it will donate $20 for each case of bottles sold in Florida to the Coastal Conservation Association (CCA) in that state. On top of that, McCormick donates $1 to an environmental cause per case sold nationwide.

The marketing message is so powerful you’d think they were selling milk; McCormick’s newly established Earth Friendly Distilling Co. says the 360 Vodka has been ‘sustainably developed and packaged’. The company ‘establishes new standards’ in the distilling industry. Bottles are made from 85% recycled glass and the New Leaf label is made from 100% PCW paper. The inks used in both the label and the rest of the package prints of the 360 Vodka are not petroleum but water based.

The list goes on. Distillation facilities meet all EPA air and water quality standards. That means that sulfur dioxide emissions are down 99%. Volatile organic compounds output is slashed 70%. Fossil fuel energy saved? 250%, according to the company. All is great! What’s even better, the company will find a willing ear among consumers; research just out by Mintel, the consumer research organization, shows that consumer appetite for ‘green’ food is driven by health considerations.

Mintel’s Green Living report points out that there is a link between health concerns and a desire to eat organic food. The market is booming, Mintel says, estimating the natural food and drink products market to be $19.6 billion this year, up from $11.9 billion in 2007. Producers play into this by becoming ever more innovative in new product development.

The research document singles out ‘green’ alcoholic beverages as particularly fast growing. Other than spirits, locally produced wine is experiencing growth due to the industry’s efforts to counter worries about its heavy usage of glass and impact on the environment due to huge producer-consumer distances. ‘Roll out the barrel’ never sounded so giddy.

March 21, 2008 at 10:43 am Leave a comment

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