Posts tagged ‘greenhouse gas emissions’

Motorola Launches Its First Carbon Neutral Phone

Motorola recently launched what they claim to be first ever carbon neutral phone at the Consumer Electrics Show in Las Vegas. Additionally, the plastics used in the phone’s exterior are made from recycled water bottles.  The company signed up with Carbonfund.org to offset the carbon produced during the manufacturing process of the handset. Distribution and operating activities are also offset. Motorola invests in the Carbonfund’s program of renewable energy and reforestation investments.

When you take a close look at the phone you will see that the Carbonfund investment is not a free ticket to environmental utopia because the press buttons and the robust exterior are entirely made of the kinds of metals that still will need recycling at the end of the phone’s life. But, having said that, knowing that the plastics are 100% made of recycled bottles is hopeful, especially when competitors like Nokia and Samsung are using bioplastics made from food crops. The Carbonfund also awarded Motorola with its CarbonFree® Product Certification after an extensive product life-cycle assessment. (more…)

January 29, 2009 at 9:45 pm Leave a comment

Bangkok Climate Summit Negotiators Are Playing For Time

The climate change summit in Bangkok which ends tomorrow is not expected to reach much progress. Analysts say that the talks at best will result in an agreement to schedule more rounds of negotiations. The talks which are sponsored by the United Nations, would require new financing if this is the case.

The meeting aimed to draft an accord succeeding the Kyoto Protocol which expires in 2012. The Bangkok talks are the first of what had been planned to be three summits. Some 1,200 delegates from 63 countries are participating. The negotiators are working on the basis of the ‘principle of common but differentiated responsibility’ which they accepted in Bali in 2007. In other words, the new pact will bind all countries to various actions.

These are the opinions of the main countries involved:

China; developed countries should live up to a guideline they agreed on in Bali; 2020 cuts of 25 to 40 percent below 1990 levels.
(more…)

April 3, 2008 at 1:14 pm Leave a comment

Key Greenhouse Gas Emissions Data Set To Boost Prices On The European Climate Exchange

European carbon traders are eagerly awaiting benchmark numbers on European greenhouse gas emissions during 2007. European countries ought to have submitted the data in a central system yesterday but many failed to meet the deadline. banner_environment_en.jpg

That is why the Brussels authorities in charge of the central system have not yet released the information on the Community Independent Transaction Log (CITL), the central system. The numbers are key because they allow market traders to know the right level of demand for the instruments they trade.

EU regulations mandate that energy-intensive companies involved in carbon offsets submit one emissions permit for every ton of carbon dioxide emissions they create. The permits are called EU Allowances (EUAs) and since 2005 there’s been a healthy trade in them. Traders have created futures and options derived from the EUAs. Volumes as well as the prices on the European Climate Exchange have been going through the roof in the past year. During March 2008, almost 120 million tonnes EUAs were traded, an increase of 61% compared to March 2007.

Reuters interviewed a Deutsche Bank analyst, Mark Lewis, about his expectations for the 2007 emissions levels. Lewis expects 2007 carbon dioxide emissions to be between 2,180-2,220 million tons. 2007 levels were between 2,100-2,140 million tons.

The 2008 permit supply is 2,083 million tons, which means there’s a shortage of supply. EUA prices will likely rock once the data is released. Lewis estimates the price is likely to go up to 35 euros per ton during 2008-12. Last Friday, EUA futures contracts were trading down 14 cents at 22.12 euros ($34.87).

During the first phase of the carbon market (2005-2007) trading was characterized by an oversupply of permits which caused the carbon price to fall.

The UK has independently already released its estimates for 2007 emissions levels. Government officials published provisional figures showing UK emission levels reached 639.4 million tonnes, which was 2 percent lower than the 2006.

The authorities in charge of CITL reported that not enough data had been submitted for them to release it. At least 80% of the data entered for the 2006 emissions needs to have been reported before the numbers will be released. This is so the markets don’t trade on false information.

CITL announced that it won’t ‘give public access to installation-level verified emissions data today [April 1]’. Instead, the data will be released as soon as enough submissions have been registered to make the 80% grade.
The officials in charge will release the numbers until at least 80% of the data that was submitted in 2006 has been entered.

Angelique van Engelen writes http://Amplifiedgreen.wordpress.com, a blog about micro green options, macro perspectives.

April 3, 2008 at 9:38 am Leave a comment

Scientists Discover How To Turn Glycerol Into Hydrogen Gas

Biodiesel is a renewable energy, alternative to rapidly depleting fossil fuels. Its main drawback is the production of low value crude glycerol, which potentially threatens the environment. But researchers say they’ve found the perfect solution to this.

Scientists at the University of Leeds in the UK not only have found a perfect alternative to simply disposing of glycerol, they’ve discovered a valuable hidden energy source. They’ve succesfully started turning low-grade sludge into high-value, hydrogen-rich gas.

Hydrogen is itself viewed as a future ‘clean’ replacement for hydrocarbon-based transport fuels, and most countries currently reliant on these fuels are investing heavily in hydrogen development programmes. At the moment, hydrogen is mostly in demand for use in fertilisers, chemical plants and food production.

The novel process was developed by Dr Valerie Dupont at Leeds University’s Faculty of Engineering. Dupont and colleagues mix glycerol with steam at a controlled temperature, separating the waste product into hydrogen, water and carbon dioxide, with no residues. A special absorbent material filters out the carbon dioxide, which leaves a much purer product.

“Hydrogen has been identified as a key future fuel for low carbon energy systems such as power generation in fuel cells and as a transport fuel”, says Dupont.

The way hydrogen is produced at the moment is a lot more expensive. Scientists use either increasingly scarce fossil fuel sources to create hydrogen, or they turn to less efficient methods such as water electrolysis.

“Our process is a clean, renewable alternative to conventional methods. It produces something with high value from a low grade by-product for which there are few economical upgrading mechanisms” says Dr Dupont.

She adds that her method is also a near ‘carbon-neutral’ process. “The CO2 generated is not derived from the use of fossil fuels,” according to Dr Dupont.

As the race towards the ‘hydrogen economy’ accelerates, the process needs to become scalable to industrial production, something which Dr Dupont says is definitely a possibility. Glycerine derived hydrogen gas could be an economically important and sustainable way of meeting the growing demand for hydrogen, she believes.

Dr Dupont’s research has been funded with a £270k grant from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) under the Energy programme.

December 10, 2007 at 9:28 am Leave a comment












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